Chronicle your costume creation and share photos of your disguise.
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By April May
#98790
I typically do a flat makeup job each year, but do it up in a slightly cartoonish/illustrated way that makes it subtly three dimensional. Here is last year's demon (which is also in my avatar) lurking in the woods:

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I decided to do something different this year. This was my first time using prosthetics. My goal was to create a super realistic goblin.

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I applied the prosthetics using spirit gum and then blended the edges to my skin using non-tack pros aide. I created a base color that was just a touch more greenish and pale than a human's skin tone and painted it on to my entire face, ears, and neck. Then, I used regular old grease paint to add shadow depth, splotches, and highlights. The finishing touch was spirit gumming some of my cat's fur on to the eyebrows. :lol:

I was happy with the outcome and everything held up well for 12 hours of wear. :thumbsup:

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By Zombie Pumpkins!
#98964
April, your makeup work is inspiring! Like you, I often do flat painted face makeup for Halloween. It's faster and more comfortable, and you can get a surprising amount of 3D effect with shading. I also like making my face painting cartoony and exaggerated.

That said, you really blow people away when you apply foam latex appliances. Suddenly you're looking like you stepped off a movie set! And you knocked it out of the park with your goblin. The brows and nose and chin and ears... changing all your features so much. I've done this sort of makeup once before, so I can appreciate the effort it takes for application and painting. Sticking down the edges. Painting all the details. You even managed to make your hands look wrinkled with dirty nails. Great job overall.

Also, nice work with the photos. Good lighting to really show us the details. And I appreciate when people take photos "on location" so that shot in the woods is full of appropriate atmosphere.

:?: A couple questions - Where did you get the prosthetic pieces? And what did you learn from the process? Anything you'd do differently next time?
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By April May
#99067
Zombie Pumpkins! wrote:
Sun Mar 18, 2018 5:43 pm
:?: A couple questions - Where did you get the prosthetic pieces? And what did you learn from the process? Anything you'd do differently next time?
Sorry for the super delayed response!

The prosthetics are all just widely-available Woochie products.

I learned a few things, mainly that it's good to carry a little vial of spirit gum with you. I wore this all day and eventually the parts nearest my mouth starting lifting at the edges. That can completely ruin your illusion, but can be remedied in just 2 minutes. Luckily, I thought about this before I left the house and didn't have to run back home.

I also learned that pax paint (acrylic and prosaide) does not come off the skin easily. Worth it in the end.

What would I do differently next time? I'd do less of a good job. Meaning.. simplify.. a little bit less detail and character and less of a gritty/realistic paint job and more bold/cartoonish details. I'd leave more of my own natural features to show through so people knew it was me without asking. I transformed myself so much that a lot of people assumed that I was wearing a mask.

This year I aim to do a combination of appliance/effects and flat, finely detailed paint. I want the two methods to work together in harmony.
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By Zombie Pumpkins!
#99073
Thanks for the insight into your experience. What you learned might help others if they read this first.

And I totally get what you're saying about wanting leave some of your own face showing through, so people will recognize that it's you. If you cover up too much, and make it too realistic, it could be anyone. Which is fine for a movie, but socially you sort of want credit for your hard work.

You want people to be able to appreciate that you actually applied prosthetics and face paint to your skin. It could be a little discouraging if you spend hours creating your makeup art, only to have someone say "who's that stranger who took the easy way out and just slipped on a mask?"